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Goodman Gallery is pleased to present iconic works by Carrie Mae Weems in a special viewing room exhibition spread across two lower ground spaces at the gallery – organised in collaboration with Jack Shainman Gallery and Galerie Barbara Thumm.

Carrie Mae Weems | Special Viewing Room Exhibition -  - Viewing Room - Goodman Gallery Viewing Rooms

The show runs concurrently to the artist’s largest UK exhibition to date at The Barbican, Reflections for Now (22 June – 3 September).

Steeped in African American history, Weems’s photographs and videos explore race, family, class, and gender identity. The artist, who has also worked in verse and performance, embraces activism throughout all her work—in particular, she looks to history in order to better understand the present. In the early 1990s, Weems rose to prominence with her “Kitchen Table” series: intimate black-and-white photographs that undermine tropes of African American life and womanhood as they depict the artist seated at her kitchen table alone or alongside various other characters.

Carrie Mae Weems | Special Viewing Room Exhibition -  - Viewing Room - Goodman Gallery Viewing Rooms
Carrie Mae Weems | Special Viewing Room Exhibition -  - Viewing Room - Goodman Gallery Viewing Rooms

Carrie Mae Weems
Untitled (two women dancing) from the Louisiana Project, 2003

 

Print on canvas
Work: 152.4 x 213.4 x 2.5 cm / 60 x 84 x 1 in.
Edition 1 of 3 2AP

 

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Carrie Mae Weems | Special Viewing Room Exhibition -  - Viewing Room - Goodman Gallery Viewing Rooms

Carrie Mae Weems
Untitled (woman walking with candelabra) from Louisiana Project, 2003

 

Print on canvas
Work: 152.4 x 213.4 x 2.5 cm / 60 x 84 x 1 in.
Edition 2 of 3 + 1 AP

 

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The Louisiana Project (2003) examines the distant past of slaveholding and the state’s recent present, characterized by economic crisis and racial segregation. It takes as its starting point the ubiquitous New Orleans festival Mardi Gras as well as the parades and balls associated with all-white groups who parade through the streets during the annual celebration of Carnival.

The work considers a triad of relationships between white men, white women, and women of colour played out as a sort of shadow dance. It uses the symbolism of the mirror as a means of reflection on the region and its history and on attitudes about blackness and sexual identity. The work is an attempt by which Weems positions herself as a witness to both past and future histories. It is to be confronted by one’s own position as a viewer and to acknowledge the ever-present power of the gaze and perpetual struggle by women artists, in their work and in their persons, to control image.

The Louisiana Project is also currently on view at LUMA Arles, Carrie Mae Weems: The Shape of Things.

Carrie Mae Weems | Special Viewing Room Exhibition -  - Viewing Room - Goodman Gallery Viewing Rooms

Carrie Mae Weems
Untitled (trio of women at small table, one looking in a mirror) from Louisiana Project, 2003

 

Print on canvas
Work: 152.4 x 213.4 x 2.5 cm / 60 x 84 x 1 in.
Edition 1 of 3 + 2 APs

 

Enquire

Carrie Mae Weems | Special Viewing Room Exhibition -  - Viewing Room - Goodman Gallery Viewing Rooms

Carrie Mae Weems
Untitled (couple dancing with mask, woman on left) from Louisiana Project, 2003

 

Print on canvas
Work: 152.4 x 213.4 x 2.5 cm / 60 x 84 x 1 in.
Edition 1 of 3 + 2AP

 

Enquire

Carrie Mae Weems | Special Viewing Room Exhibition -  - Viewing Room - Goodman Gallery Viewing Rooms

Carrie Mae Weems
Untitled (two women seated at a small table) from Louisiana Project, 2003

 

Print on canvas
Work: 152.4 x 213.4 x 2.5 cm / 60 x 84 x 1 in.
Edition 2 of 3 + 1 AP

 

Enquire

Carrie Mae Weems | Special Viewing Room Exhibition -  - Viewing Room - Goodman Gallery Viewing Rooms

Carrie Mae Weems
Untitled (two women seated at a small table, each looking in a mirror) from Louisiana Project, 2003


Print on canvas
Work: 152.4 x 213.4 x 2.5 cm / 60 x 84 x 1 in.
Edition 2 of 3 + 1 AP

 

Enquire

Blue Notes (2014) features portraits of black artists whose faces are covered by blocks of solid colour. The formal vandalism is at once a reflection and critique of America’s historical erasure of black artists. In Colour Real and Imagined (2014), Weems juxtaposes a portrait of singer and pianist Dinah Washington with bright, monochromatic square panels. This visual layering is a tool by which to analyse the extent to which aesthetics can act as a distorting force when it comes to issues of politics, gender, race, class and the social construction of identity.

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Slide-Show Thumbnails
Carrie Mae Weems
Color Real and Imagined, 2014

 

Archival pigment with silkscreened color blocks.
Work: 76.2 x 116.8 cm / 30 x 46 in.
Edition 9 of 10 + 2APs + 12PPs

 

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Carrie Mae Weems
Color Real and Imagined, 2014

 

Archival pigment with silkscreened color blocks.
Work: 76.2 x 116.8 cm / 30 x 46 in.
Edition 9 of 10 + 2APs + 12PPs

 

Enquire

Carrie Mae Weems
Blue Notes (Mick and Lisa Fischer), 2014

 

Archival pigment with silkscreened color blocks.
Work (Paper): 81.3 x 61.3 cm / 32 x 24.14 in.
Edition 2 of 5 + 2APs + 2PPs

 

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Carrie Mae Weems
Blue Notes (Mick and Lisa Fischer), 2014

 

Archival pigment with silkscreened color blocks.
Work (Paper): 81.3 x 61.3 cm / 32 x 24.14 in.
Edition 2 of 5 + 2APs + 2PPs

 

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Carrie Mae Weems
Blue Notes (Claudia Lennear #1), 2014

 

Archival pigment with silkscreened color blocks.
Work (Framed): 99.1 x 78.7 x 5.5 cm / 39 x 31 x 2.18 in.
Edition 3 of 5 + 2 APs + 2 PPs

 

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Carrie Mae Weems
Blue Notes (Claudia Lennear #1), 2014

 

Archival pigment with silkscreened color blocks.
Work (Framed): 99.1 x 78.7 x 5.5 cm / 39 x 31 x 2.18 in.
Edition 3 of 5 + 2 APs + 2 PPs

 

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Carrie Mae Weems
Blue Notes (Basquiat): Who’s Who or a Pair of Aces #1, 2014

 

Archival pigment with silkscreened color blocks.
Work (Paper): 84.7 x 64.4 cm / 29.78 x 21.78 in.
Edition 5 of 5 + 2 APs +2 PPs

 

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Carrie Mae Weems
Blue Notes (Basquiat): Who’s Who or a Pair of Aces #1, 2014

 

Archival pigment with silkscreened color blocks.
Work (Paper): 84.7 x 64.4 cm / 29.78 x 21.78 in.
Edition 5 of 5 + 2 APs +2 PPs

 

Enquire

Carrie Mae Weems
Blue Notes (Claudia Lennear #2), 2014

 

Archival pigment with silkscreened color blocks.
Work (Framed): 99.1 x 78.7 x 5.5 cm / 39 x 31 x 2.18 in.
Edition 2 of 5 +2APs + 2PPs

 

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Carrie Mae Weems
Blue Notes (Claudia Lennear #2), 2014

 

Archival pigment with silkscreened color blocks.
Work (Framed): 99.1 x 78.7 x 5.5 cm / 39 x 31 x 2.18 in.
Edition 2 of 5 +2APs + 2PPs

 

Enquire

Carrie Mae Weems
Color Real and Imagined, 2014

 

Archival pigment with silkscreened color blocks.
Work: 76.2 x 116.8 cm / 30 x 46 in.
Edition 9 of 10 + 2APs + 12PPs

 

Enquire

Carrie Mae Weems
Color Real and Imagined, 2014

 

Archival pigment with silkscreened color blocks.
Work: 76.2 x 116.8 cm / 30 x 46 in.
Edition 9 of 10 + 2APs + 12PPs

 

Enquire

Carrie Mae Weems
Blue Notes (Mick and Lisa Fischer), 2014

 

Archival pigment with silkscreened color blocks.
Work (Paper): 81.3 x 61.3 cm / 32 x 24.14 in.
Edition 2 of 5 + 2APs + 2PPs

 

Enquire

Carrie Mae Weems
Blue Notes (Mick and Lisa Fischer), 2014

 

Archival pigment with silkscreened color blocks.
Work (Paper): 81.3 x 61.3 cm / 32 x 24.14 in.
Edition 2 of 5 + 2APs + 2PPs

 

Enquire

Carrie Mae Weems
Blue Notes (Claudia Lennear #1), 2014

 

Archival pigment with silkscreened color blocks.
Work (Framed): 99.1 x 78.7 x 5.5 cm / 39 x 31 x 2.18 in.
Edition 3 of 5 + 2 APs + 2 PPs

 

Enquire

Carrie Mae Weems
Blue Notes (Claudia Lennear #1), 2014

 

Archival pigment with silkscreened color blocks.
Work (Framed): 99.1 x 78.7 x 5.5 cm / 39 x 31 x 2.18 in.
Edition 3 of 5 + 2 APs + 2 PPs

 

Enquire

Carrie Mae Weems
Blue Notes (Basquiat): Who’s Who or a Pair of Aces #1, 2014

 

Archival pigment with silkscreened color blocks.
Work (Paper): 84.7 x 64.4 cm / 29.78 x 21.78 in.
Edition 5 of 5 + 2 APs +2 PPs

 

Enquire

Carrie Mae Weems
Blue Notes (Basquiat): Who’s Who or a Pair of Aces #1, 2014

 

Archival pigment with silkscreened color blocks.
Work (Paper): 84.7 x 64.4 cm / 29.78 x 21.78 in.
Edition 5 of 5 + 2 APs +2 PPs

 

Enquire

Carrie Mae Weems
Blue Notes (Claudia Lennear #2), 2014

 

Archival pigment with silkscreened color blocks.
Work (Framed): 99.1 x 78.7 x 5.5 cm / 39 x 31 x 2.18 in.
Edition 2 of 5 +2APs + 2PPs

 

Enquire

Carrie Mae Weems
Blue Notes (Claudia Lennear #2), 2014

 

Archival pigment with silkscreened color blocks.
Work (Framed): 99.1 x 78.7 x 5.5 cm / 39 x 31 x 2.18 in.
Edition 2 of 5 +2APs + 2PPs

 

Enquire

Untitled (Listening Devices) (2014) is a series of photogravure prints of communication devices that are posed as if having their portraits taken. The image of a simple megaphone, while next to it is the classic two cans connected by a string. Other squares are occupied by old fashioned telephones. Missing, of course, are references to smart phones of any kind. These mute objects, awaiting activation, suggest a failure in the act of communication. The portraits stress the need for the speaker and the listener to actively engage and hear each other out. The mute listening devices here demand us to actively listen; de-center ourselves and our experiences.

Weems’s critically acclaimed contribution to art has universally foregrounded the learning and unlearning that must be done personally and collectively in the art world and museums regarding racism, sexism, pay equity, decolonization, land acknowledgements, and so many other things. In “Listening Devices”, audiences are prompted to participate in this process.

Carrie Mae Weems | Special Viewing Room Exhibition -  - Viewing Room - Goodman Gallery Viewing Rooms

Carrie Mae Weems
Listening Devices (Full Set), 2014

 

Set of 11 Photogravures
Work (each): 48.26 x 43.18 cm (19 x 17 in.)
Edition 1 of 2

 

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Carrie Mae Weems | Special Viewing Room Exhibition -  - Viewing Room - Goodman Gallery Viewing Rooms

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Thumb-Show Thumbnails
Carrie Mae Weems, Device #1, 2013/2014

Carrie Mae Weems, Device #1, 2013/2014

Carrie Mae Weems, Device #2, 2013/2014

Carrie Mae Weems, Device #2, 2013/2014

Carrie Mae Weems, Device #3, 2013/2014

Carrie Mae Weems, Device #3, 2013/2014

Carrie Mae Weems, Device #4, 2013/2014

Carrie Mae Weems, Device #4, 2013/2014

Carrie Mae Weems, Device #5, 2013/2014

Carrie Mae Weems, Device #5, 2013/2014

Carrie Mae Weems, Device #6, 2013/2014

Carrie Mae Weems, Device #6, 2013/2014

Carrie Mae Weems, Device #7, 2013/2014

Carrie Mae Weems, Device #7, 2013/2014

Carrie Mae Weems, Device #8, 2013/2014

Carrie Mae Weems, Device #8, 2013/2014

Carrie Mae Weems, Device #9, 2013/2014

Carrie Mae Weems, Device #9, 2013/2014

Carrie Mae Weems, Device #10, 2013/2014

Carrie Mae Weems, Device #10, 2013/2014

Carrie Mae Weems, Device #11, 2013/2014

Carrie Mae Weems, Device #11, 2013/2014

Carrie Mae Weems, Device #1, 2013/2014

Carrie Mae Weems, Device #1, 2013/2014

Carrie Mae Weems, Device #2, 2013/2014

Carrie Mae Weems, Device #2, 2013/2014

Carrie Mae Weems, Device #3, 2013/2014

Carrie Mae Weems, Device #3, 2013/2014

Carrie Mae Weems, Device #4, 2013/2014

Carrie Mae Weems, Device #4, 2013/2014

Carrie Mae Weems, Device #5, 2013/2014

Carrie Mae Weems, Device #5, 2013/2014

Carrie Mae Weems, Device #6, 2013/2014

Carrie Mae Weems, Device #6, 2013/2014

Carrie Mae Weems, Device #7, 2013/2014

Carrie Mae Weems, Device #7, 2013/2014

Carrie Mae Weems, Device #8, 2013/2014

Carrie Mae Weems, Device #8, 2013/2014

Carrie Mae Weems, Device #9, 2013/2014

Carrie Mae Weems, Device #9, 2013/2014

Carrie Mae Weems, Device #10, 2013/2014

Carrie Mae Weems, Device #10, 2013/2014

Carrie Mae Weems, Device #11, 2013/2014

Carrie Mae Weems, Device #11, 2013/2014

Carrie Mae Weems | Special Viewing Room Exhibition -  - Viewing Room - Goodman Gallery Viewing Rooms

Carrie Mae Weems (b. 1953 Portland, OR, lives and works in Syracuse, New York) is considered one of the most influential contemporary American artists. Her work investigates family relationships, cultural identity, sexism, class, political systems, and the consequences of power.

Determined as ever to enter the picture—both literally and metaphorically—Weems has sustained an on-going dialogue within contemporary discourse for over thirty years. During this time, she has developed a complex body of art employing photographs, text, fabric, audio, digital images, installation, and video.

Major solo and group exhibitions have been held at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, The Frist Center for Visual Art, Solomon Guggenheim Museum in New York, and the Centro Andaluz de Arte Contemporáneo in Seville, Spain.

Weems’s work is held in the collections of the Tate Modern, London, the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, Whitney Museum of American Art, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C., San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA), Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles (MOCA), Studio Museum in Harlem, Art Institute of Chicago, MCA Chicago.

Over the course of her career, Weems has received honours from the Prix de Roma, the National Endowment of the Arts Fellowship and the MacArthur “Genius Grant.” In 2014, she became the first Black woman to mount a retrospective at the Guggenheim.